February 2016 Meeting

NAR logo We had a special guest drop by at the beginning of our meeting!  Dr. David Robertson, Physics Professor at Otterbein University,  stayed after his last class to see how we liked our “new digs”.  Dave shared his appreciation of our alliance and thinks that more students will get involved as word spreads of our presence on campus.  Oh, and we REALLY appreciate our “new digs”.

CORSA members elected our first board of directors.  All nominees were acclaimed (unopposed).  Our new and first leadership team is:

Director – Lloyd N. NAR 97987
Deputy Director – Joe P. NAR 83768
Recording/Financial Officer – Ed H. NAR 71396
Senior Adviser – Paul D. NAR 26702

We have narrowed our LPR/MPR launch site search down to three possibilities. Lloyd has already begun contacting the municipal entities that own the sites. While we all have “go fever” it’s important for us to stay focused on securing a site as a responsible community partner. We will not fly without permission and then ask for forgiveness. We are taking the responsible and more challenging path of building alliances with land owners (public and private) to secure sites we can use on a consistent basis. It might take a little longer to secure a site, but in the end we will have a working partnership that hopefully should ensure we can remain welcome guests for the long run.

Our rocket discussion was “Hidden Gems of the NAR Web Site”. We reviewed logging in and how to update our personal information. The members only access to R&D reports had members ooing and ahhing until we had mental overload. There is SO MUCH information in this area it would take months to read it all. The safety area of the web site has been updated and provides easy access to a lot of valuable information. Most of the reports are on high power safety but the principals found within them can be applied to low and mid power as well. In the education area we had a brief review of the NARTREK program and TARC which will be a major outreach objective once we have a launch site. Last, but not least, we explored the competition area.

MARCH MEETING PREVIEW! – Open Rocket overview with Ed! Flying rockets is fun, building kits is more fun, and modifying the kits is even better, but the ultimate prize is to fly your own original design. OpenRocket is a free, fully featured model rocket simulator that allows you to design and simulate your rockets before actually building and flying them.” You can down load Open Rocket for free from their web site: http://openrocket.sourceforge.net/

You can view the meeting presentation here: CORSA 02_2016 February Meeting

January 2016 Meeting

Members with the rockets that were brought for show and tell.

Members with the rockets that were brought for show and tell.

We started the New Year in our new home at Otterbein University. We want to express our gratitude to the University, the Physics Department, for the use of the facility, as well as Drs. David Robertson &and Aaron Reinhard of the Physics Department for meeting with us in November and opening the door for this new community alliance. THANK YOU!!

We have been looking for and at fields in the central Ohio area that are at least 1,000 ft. on their smallest side for low power and mid power rocket launches. We have identified some sites and are preparing to contact the land owners.

Members brought their favorite rockets that they have built over the years.  Michael N brought an Estes Baby Bertha.  Joe P. brought his Phoenix and X-15 rockets.  Lloyd N brought a Quest Courier and shared his favorite scratch built parachutes and streamers.  Ed H. shared the”BIG ROCKET” he used for his HPR2 certification.

You can view the meeting presentation here: CORSA 01_2016 January Meeting

Cub Scout Launch is a BLAST!

Parents and scouts enjoying a smooth safe launch.

Parents and scouts enjoying a smooth safe launch.

Cub Scout troop 701 in Sunbury, Ohio successfully launched their rocket projects this past Sunday. CORSA provided full launch support which allowed the scouts the experience a genuine NAR sport launch. Each flier filled out a launch card every time they flew. Erich Zahn provided assistance with packing recovery systems, and inserting motors/igniters to those who needed it. After the rockets were ready, the scouts had their rockets checked out by Paul Demus who was the RSO (Range Safety Officer), then proceeded to Ed Hingsbergen who was the LCO (Launch Control Officer) for their final trek out to the pad. 30 different fliers flew a total of 55 flights. There were no CATO’s or RUD’s but a few rockets did experience recovery failures including one “heads up” lawn dart. The motor report for the launch is:

1/2A – 4
A – 24
B – 10
C – 4
unknown – 13

A small sample of the many rockets the scouts flew.

A small sample of the many rockets the scouts flew.

The scouts flew a variety of Rockets. There was a Estes Mini Fat Boy in a red white and blue paint scheme, an Alpha III, a Shuttle Xpress, two Phantom Blues that went up solo then were launched in a drag race, and many, many others.

Scouts and parents didn’t just show up, fly, and leave. Many questions were asked and answered as the crowd made observations about flights. A scout asked why the rockets seemed to float sideways (parallel to the ground) before ejection. A CORSA member explained the relationship of the wind, center of gravity, center of pressure and why the rocket floated sideways. After seeing all the different motors people were using one parent asked what all the numbers and letters meant on the side of the motor. Paul Demus explained the code which prompted even more questions. It was good to see the participants engaging in rocket discussions.

The scouts and their parents gradually left with the smell of black powder in their rockets and smiles on their faces.

CORSA members Paul Demus (left) and Ed Hingsbergen review launch operations before scouts arrive.

CORSA members Paul Demus (left) and Ed Hingsbergen review launch operations before scouts arrive.

CORSA members Paul Demus and Erich Zahn are ready to help the scouts.

CORSA members Paul Demus and Erich Zahn are ready to help the scouts.

5 - 4 - 3 - 2 - 1 - LAUNCH!

5 – 4 – 3 – 2 – 1 – LAUNCH!

Rocket Team at OSU Launch Support

 

CORSA Director Lloyd Newman assists a first time rocketeer at the pad.

CORSA Director Lloyd Newman (left) assists a first time rocketeer at the pad.

By- Erich Zahn NAR 98427 and President of the Rocket Club at The Ohio State University

The purpose of the Ohio State rocket launch was to give our new members experience building and launching a low powered rocket (LPR) and also to have fun. Considering many of the new members did not have any experience with rockets, this was their chance to start learning about rocketry. We bought an educational pack of Estes Vulcan Rockets for everyone to build. It was fairly cheap and was able to be put together with wood glue in about an hour so it was the perfect model to give our members for one of the first meetings. It was active enough to get them excited for the school year and for the club but critical enough that they had to think about the design of their model. With the Vulcans we used Estes B6-4 motors since they could be launched in a nearby field without risk of losing the rockets.

That next week we launched the rockets at a nearby park with the help of the newly formed NAR chapter the Central Ohio Rocketry and Spacemodeling Alliance (CORSA). The members of CORSA were generous enough to bring their launch stand so that we could launch multiple rockets at once. As well as ensuring the general smooth running of the launch, they were also able to help out the rocket team when the friction fit motors were slipping out the back of the rockets. There were still several motor separations but without their help half of the rockets may not have been able to launch. Throughout the entire launch there were many “wows!” and lots of talk on how their flight went as well as how the current flight is going; lots of “that was a good one” or laughing if it spun out of control. One member expressed their excitement by stating they wanted to start launching their own rockets. Luckily there were no CATO’s; however, there was one case where the center of pressure (CP) was too far away from the center of gravity (CG) and the rocket spun out of control nearly 20 feet off of the launch pad. No one was hurt but everyone was given the spectacle of a failed launch. Overall everyone enjoyed the launch! They appreciated the help and shared knowledge from the CORSA members. This was a great launch to start out the semester with and I know all of them look forward to more launches in the future!

 

Members of the Rocket Team at The Ohio State University installing their motors before flight.

Members of the Rocket Team at The Ohio State University installing their motors before flight.

Rocket Team President and CORSA Member Erich Zahn assists a team member at the pad.

Rocket Team President and CORSA Member Erich Zahn (left) assists a team member at the pad.

Lloyd Newman, CORSA Director, assists Erich Zahn, Rocket Team President and CORSA member, with failure analysis on a rocket motor that failed to ignite.

Lloyd Newman (left), CORSA Director, assists Erich Zahn, Rocket Team President and CORSA member, with failure analysis on a rocket motor that failed to ignite.

Lift off!

Lift off!

Members of the Rocket Team at The Ohio State University ready for launch.

Members of the Rocket Team at The Ohio State University ready for launch.

Members of the Rocket Team at The Ohio State University ready for launch.

Members of the Rocket Team at The Ohio State University ready for launch.

Another successful lift off!

Another successful lift off!

Erich Zahn, Rocket Team President and CORSA member, assists other rocket team members at the pad.

Erich Zahn(right), Rocket Team President and CORSA member, assists other rocket team members at the pad.

Presentation to Cub Scout Troop 701

Cub Scout Troop 701.

By – Ed Hingsbergen NAR 71396

On September 14, Lloyd and I attended a meeting of Sunbury Cub Scout Troop 701. Lloyd gave an energetic presentation of an introduction to model rocketry. He described what does and does not constitute a model rocket,and talked about the forces at work on a rocket in flight. He also explained the model rocket safety code, and how observing it leads to a remarkably safe and exciting hobby.

Lloyd N. NAR #97987 explains what a shock cord is & why it's important.

Lloyd N. NAR #97987 explains what a shock cord is & why it’s important.

The Scouts were attentive and engrossed, and full of questions. After the presentation, they were anxious to get a close look at the rockets Lloyd had brought, and learn all that they could. Lloyd and I enjoyed the opportunity to work with the Cub Scouts, and look forward to working with them at their launch planned for September 27.

NAR Section Charter Accepted

CORSA_NAR

A screen capture of the Central Ohio Rocketry & Spacemodeling Alliance on the NAR Club Locator page.

Our charter application has been accepted and approved by the National Association of Rocketry.  Isn’t that great?! Sure! Exactly what does that mean to you though?

If you’re a land owner or land operator interested in supporting rocketry by allowing your lands to be used as a launch range,  we can offer insurance to you through our NAR charter.  NAR members may choose to join CORSA with the assurance that we uphold and maintain the same level of quality and safety as NAR.  HPR NAR members can be assured the section will keep and maintain an FAA waiver for our launch ranges (when we secure them).  You know your competition points will count when you participate in our NAR sanctioned competitions.  Last, you know you’ll be connected with other NAR members and not a bunch of flash-bang rocket locos.

We will take our responsibility to the central Ohio community seriously, offering support to NAR partner organizations like Team America Rocketry Challenge teams, 4-H and the Civil Air Patrol.  We’re dedicated to the spread of rocketry through education and launch support for civic clubs and non-profit youth organizations such as Girl Scouts, and Boy Scouts.  Last but certainly not least we’re here to provide NAR quality guidance and support to individuals regardless if you’re just starting out in rocketry or a long-timer, short-timer or BAR looking to get involved again.

We are grateful to NAR for allowing us to be a chartered section and look forward to the opportunity to carry out the NAR mission in central Ohio.

We’re Counting Down

Launch Date: 1 SEP 2015

Mission

The Central Ohio Rocketry & Spacemodeling Alliance is a chartered section of the National Association of Rocketry (NAR), a 501(c)3 non-profit corporation, organized exclusively to:

  • Carry out the purpose, mission and goals of the NAR on a regional level
  • Promote the educational, and scientific purpose of rocketry and spacemodeling applied science, technology, engineering and math
  • Support schools, non-profit youth organizations and citizens of central Ohio in the pursuit of the understanding and application of rocketry and spacemodeling technology